Seriously. Why Do We Procrastinate?

Carol Gignoux, M.Ed

Filed Under: ADHD, Procrastination, Procrastinating, Executive Functioning Weakness / Disorder

Why Do We Procrastinate?

Is procrastination a common human tendency?

why do we procrastinate
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Today more than 20 percent of adults are serial procrastinators. As many as 70 to 90 percent of undergraduate students consistently put off doing things.  A recent study that surveyed executives, supervisors, and employees in the workplace found that 88% of them reported that they procrastinate on a regular basis.

Just living in a fast paced highly stimulating world can create a ill conceived idea we need to put things off until later in order to survive. In fact it is no longer true that you probably have ADHD or Executive Functioning issues if you procrastinate. We are all vulnerable to it’s siren song. What is the true nature of procrastination and why do we do it?  Could it be an emotional response to a distasteful task that even though we’re aware that avoiding the task is probably a bad idea, still we procrastinate?
Procrastination is actually a short term solution to a long term problem –  a problem that is not only unlikely to go away but probably going to get worse. What we now understand is that people engage in an irrational cycle of chronic procrastination because of an inability to tolerate and manage negative moods around a task. We may know intellectually that its harmful to put something off until later, but our emotions are accustomed to getting the upper hand over our wiser thinking. In other words, even though our future self may value the long term rewards of doing something, our current self has to take action and it prefers instant gratification.
 
The cost of procrastination can be high. It can seriously affect job performance, marriage, parenting, finances, self confidence, emotional stability and happiness. Take a moment and rate yourself. Ask yourself: How is procrastination impacting your life? What is it costing you really? How much longer are you willing to pay that price? Don’t try to address it on your own. People will tell you that that the only way out of it is working through it – with the help of a qualified professional like an Executive Functioning Coach who understands this issue on a deep and wide level.

Get more tips for living with Executive Dysfunction by subscribing to my newsletter. You can improve executive functioning skills! And I can help. Contact me today for a free consultation.

Make Progress with the Right Executive Function Coach

As one of the 10+ million U.S. adults with ADD, I genuinely understand the challenges of living with ADHD as well as the positive results that can be achieved through coaching. With the help of a great executive functioning skills coach, adult ADHD treatment can change lives. With the right behaviors and coping mechanisms, it’s easier to overcome some of the worst symptoms. Those include distraction, lack of punctuality, untidiness, forgetfulness, failure to meet deadlines, and more.

By practicing these success strategies, performance at work can improve, too. Life at home will become more stable and relaxing. Enrich every important personal relationship. And most importantly, you’ll gain a new level of self-confidence.

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